Nominal Resin Specifications

PP = Polypropylene  Resin used to extrude plastic netting
PE = Polyethylene
LDPE = Low Density Polyethylene
MDPE = Medium Density Polyethylene
HDPE = High Density Polyethylene
PTFE = Polytetrafluoroethylene
PBT = Polybutylene Terephthalate
PET = Polyester
N = Nylon

Resin:
Melt Temperature:
Softening Point:
Heat Deflection Temperature:
Glass Transition Temperature:

Polypropylene (PP)
363°F (161°C)
305°F (152°C)
194°F (90°C)
32°F (0°C)

* Polypropylene products produced for some filtration applications are made from resin that complies with FDA regulations for food contact. The regulation compliance is product number dependant / specific.
* Impact at cold temperatures is likely to cause strand cracking or breakage

Resin:
Melt Temperature:
Softening Point:
Heat Deflection Temperature (66 psi):
Low Temperature Brittleness, F50:

Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE)
248°F (120°C)
203°F (95°C)
113°F (45°C)
-99°F (-73°C)

* All natural LDPE products are manufactured with resin that complies with FDA regulations for food contact.

Resin:
Melt Temperature:
Softening Point:
Heat Deflection Temperature:
Low Temperature Brittleness, F50:

Medium Density Polyethylene (MDPE)
260°F (126°C)
248°F (128°C)
178°F (81°C)
-104°F (-76°C)

* Made from resin that is not compliant with FDA regulations for food contact, unless otherwise specified (product number dependent / specific).

Resin:
Melt Temperature:
Softening Point:
Heat Deflection Temperature:
Low Temperature Brittleness, F50:

High Density Polyethylene (HDPE)
266°F (130°C)
262°F (120°C)
158°F (70°C)
-104°F (-76°C)

Made from resin that is not compliant with FDA regulations for food contact, unless otherwise specified (product number dependent / specific).

Resin:
Specific Gravity:
Max. Continuous Service Temp:
Min. Continuous Service Temp:
Melt Temperature:
Heat Deflection Temperature:
Certifications:

Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)
2.14
500°F (260°C)
-100°C
608-644°F (320-340°C)
250°F @ 264 psi
Food and Drug Administration, Code of Federal Regulations, CFR 21, sections 177.1550, 177.260, 175.300, 175.105, 176.170 and 176.180

* PTFE products are stabilized to control open area percentages. As product thickness increases so does the likelihood of shrinkage in applications where temperatures are elevated.

Resin:
Melt temperature:
Softening Point:
Heat Deflection Temperature:
Glass Transition Temperature:

Polybutylene Terephthalate (PBT)
437°F (225°C)
360°F (182°C)
310°F (154°C)
-40°F (-40°C)

Made from resin that is not compliant with FDA regulations for food contact, unless otherwise specified (product number dependent / specific).

Resin:
Melt temperature:
Max. continuous use:
Max. short term temp:
U / V resistance:

Polyester (PET)
495°F (257°C)
270°F (132°C)
455°F (235°C)
Good

Resin:
Melt Temperature:
Softening Point:
Heat Deflection Temperature:
Glass Transition Temperature:

Nylon 6 (N)
428°F (220°C)
374°F (190°C)
347°F (175°C)
122°F (50°C)

* Nylon products produced for some filtration applications are made from resin that complies with FDA regulations for food contact. The regulation compliance is product number dependant / specific.

Definitions for Thermal Characteristics:

  1. HDT - Heat Deflection Temperature - The temperature of the medium at which a deflection of 0.25 mm is noted in a sample bar when subjected under pressure, 66 PSI.
  2. Vicat Softening Temperature - The temperature at which a flat-ended needle of 1-mm2 circular cross section will penetrate a thermoplastic specimen to a depth of 1 mm under a specified load using a selected uniform rate of temperature rise.
  3. Melting Temperature - The temperature at which the material starts to loose its flexible thermoplastic properties and begins to permit viscous flow readily.
  4. Glass Transition Temperature - The temperature at which the molecular structure becomes restricted which causes the material to become hard and brittle. It is the temperature at which the thermoplastic behaves like a flexible material rather than a crystalline or glassy material at lower temperatures.

Electrical Conductivity

Most plastics do not permit the flow of electric current and are, therefore, considered to be nonconductive.

Disclaimer:

The nominal information reported in this document was obtained from various manufacturers resin brochures, polymer processing books, and various internet websites. Temperature charts are to be used an a General guide only. Charts do not reflect nor are to be used as a warranty of product performance.